Kiddush Conversations

KIDDUSH CONVERSATIONS

 

 

Shabbatot, September 9, October 21, November 4, December 9, January 20, February 3, March 17, and June 16. 

From 12:30-1:15 (approximately)

Conversations led by members of Temple Aliyah

 

Join the conversation!  At Kiddush Conversations, a member of the Temple Aliyah community draws upon his or her areas of expertise and leads a Conversation on a topic of his or her choosing.  These Conversations provide an opportunity for our community to explore topics beyond the standard Shabbat fare in a casual environment.  And, we get to savor Shabbat together just a little bit more!  Come learn and join the conversation!

                                                     

Shabbat, September 9  (Alisa Levine, Presenter)

Kol Yisrael Arevim Zeh Ba Zeh:  All Members of the Jewish Community are Responsible for One Another  (Talmud - Sandhedrin 27b & Shefuot 39a).  This principle seems particularly relevant today, a time of intense individualization.  Students (and adults) are often “plugged in” not only to their own playlists, but also to their own games, schedules, books, priorities, and more. This year, Mercaz Aliyah, under the guidance of Alisa and Rabbi Carl Perkins, will focus on this guiding principle to explore the bigger questions, such as:  “What does it mean to be responsible for yourself or for others?  What does it mean to be part of a whole?  Do our actions have an impact on other Jews and on society as a whole?  Alisa will be discussing this guiding principle and lead a discussion on its implications for children and adults of all ages.

Shabbat, October 21 (Dan Winograd, Presenter)

Environmental issues from a Jewish perspective.  Water shortages, recycling, global warming, sustainability, gas fracking, the need for more regulation, the cost of too much regulation – these are just some of the environmental issues that are increasingly in the news and the focus of our attention.  With this growing discussion about the use of, and care for, the resources and natural world around us, are there Jewish values to consider?  Are natural resources ours to use as we want?  Are we obligated to safeguard the natural world?  Does Jewish teaching provide guidance on the role that people should have concerning the environment?  Come learn some Jewish perspectives and join a conversation about the environment from a Jewish standpoint.

Shabbat, November 4  (Judy Sacks, Presenter)

Working with Our Ethiopian Brothers and Sisters in Haifa.  Of the approximately 135,000 Israelis of Ethiopian descent living in Israel, about 7,000 of them live in Haifa, Boston's sister city.  For over a decade, Judy has served on the employment subcommittee of Shiluvim (Integration), established by CJP, with the mandate of working with and for the Israeli Ethiopian community to help them integrate into Israeli life.  Learn about the Haifa Ethiopian community, about Shiluvim and come for a discussion of this unique multi-service approach to community empowerment.

Shabbat, December 9 (David Lintz, Presenter)

The Books of the Maccabees.  When was the last time you read the actual four Books of the Maccabees?  Did you even know that there were four books?  Interestingly, although Chanukah is one of the most widely celebrated Jewish holidays, with a rich set of traditions, reading from the Books of the Maccabees is not one of them.  On this Shabbat before Chanukkah, David Lintz will give a brief introduction to these Books and then lead a discussion based on some of the themes in the Books.  Come join the conversation!

Shabbat, January 20 (Arnie Harris and Stephen Baum, Presenters)

Working To Enrich Lives Of The Visually Impaired.  Arnie Harris and Stephen Baum have devoted their professional lives in making the seeing world a bit more accessible to those who are visually impaired.  Arnie, in his 32nd year as music director at the Perkins School for the Blind, guides students in vocal and instrumental performances, teaching them by rote memorization and through braille.   Stephen Baum, a software programmer, played a leading role in the development of machine software for the blind at Kurzweil Computer Products.  Come hear about the amazing stories these presenters have to offer and learn how they have helped the visually impaired learn and express themselves. 

Shabbat, February 3 (Fred Borgenicht, Presenter)

The Evolving Definitions of Life & Death Through the Ages.  When, exactly, do we join the group of the 'living'? When is that we are considered 'no longer alive'? The definitions of these two concepts have changed over time, particularly with the progression of scientific knowledge.   Join a conversation on how advances in technology have forced us to wrestle with the boundaries of life and death.  

Shabbat, March 17 (Lynn Dennis, Presenter)

Are Some People Naturally Spiritually Gifted?  We know that some people are gifted in math, language, and music.  Is it possible that some people could be “spiritually” gifted?  Might some people have an innate knack for conversation with the Divine?  If so, how would that happen?  Theologians, philosophers and scientists have offered a variety of answers throughout the ages - let's talk about some of these answers and discuss the possibilities.

Shabbat, June 16 (Rabbi William Kaufman, Presenter)

Arthur A. Cohen, A Contemporary Jewish Theologian.  The late Arthur A. Cohen was a Jewish novelist and theologian.  His two main theological works are The Natural and the Supernatural Jew and The Tremendum: A Theological Interpretation of the Holocaust.  Rabbi Kaufman will discuss how these books have influenced him and their relevance for the modern Jew.   There will be time for questions and group discussion.